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World Owl Trust - leading the World in Owl Conservation

Text Version Last Updated: September 30, 2014 19:11

Wednesday 1st October, 2014

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Wulf’s Blog

Wulf

Tuesday 30th September 2014

There we go! The last day of September. We have just one month left of 2014 season. Time appears to be racing by! I was having a chat with one of Muncaster’s maintenance people during Fool’s Week at the end of May, and jokingly I said “blink, and it will be Halloween”. This most certainly appears to have been the case though, with less than four weeks until Halloween frolics commence.

Anyway, on the owl side of things, everything has been quiet. I do have one interesting snippet to pass on though; it’s on the subject of ‘bathing’. It would appear that certain owl species prefer bathing more than others. You might be surprised to know that this doesn’t include the Brown Fish Owls or Vermiculated Fishing Owl. To these species, the water dish is almost perpetually disregarded. The species that likes bathing most are the Mackinder’s Eagle Owls. Almost as soon as the water dishes have been cleaned, and fresh water has been put in them, one of them jumps in immediately commencing ‘ablutions’. This isn’t a fluke, as this is the case with both our breeding pairs, and if there can be any more doubt left, even ‘Cugat’, the Ethiopian Eagle Owl behaves the same. The Ethiopian Eagle Owl is a very closely related subspecies. The upshot of all this is; Bubo capensis in all its variant subspecies is by far the cleanest owl species we have at the Owl Centre.

See you next week

Wulf

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