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Wednesday 26th November, 2014

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Wulf’s Blog

Wulf

Tuesday 19th November 2013

We’ve managed to release an ex wild injured Buzzard which came to the centre via my house a number of months ago. It had bruised its wing, making flying impossible. The injury was only slight, but even slight injuries may be detrimental if this stops a bird of prey from being able to hunt.

We were able to release it from the Breeding Ground, as it was a local bird. It had originally come from Corney, near Waberthwaite. It was very weak and thin. It more than likely had been injured a good few days before it got picked up. This bird needed a lot of ‘TLC’ before it was fit for release. It spent most it’s time at the centre in the old quarantine unit, before being moved to an empty aviary in the Breeding Ground a few weeks ago. It became apparent by the way it was flinging itself around, that this bird had made a full recovery, and was ready for release.

The decision was made to release it during a calm weather spell last week. I watched as it flew out of the aviary, and up into a nearby Yew tree, where it settled for a while to get itself orientated. It then roused, (shook itself), and then flew off through the trees. This is probably the best part of the job; to successfully rehabilitate something back to the wild.

As I mentioned before, Muncaster at present is very quiet. This is in sharp contrast with the final week of the visitor season; Halloween Week. Having said that, today Muncaster is beautiful. The light at this time of year is really highlighting the autumn colours on the trees. I have included a few photos I took this morning. I’d say Muncaster is well worth a visit just for that at present!

While I was doing the feeding in the Breeding Ground the other day, I noticed a small flock of unfamiliar birds feeding on the Yew tree down there. Remembering that I saw Waxwings here at Muncaster this time last year, I thought this flock might be worth another look. However, light and distance wouldn’t allow me a close enough look to be able to identify the birds properly. It did mean my ‘eye’ was adjusted though, and I was noticing anything and everything that was of the feathered variety. I never realised how common the Greater Spotted Woodpecker is at Muncaster! A very nice consolation prize!

See you next week.

Wulf

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Autumn Colours On The Trees At Muncaster
Autumn Colours On The Trees At Muncaster Picture courtesy Wulf Ingham
Autumn Colours On The Trees At Muncaster
Autumn Colours On The Trees At Muncaster Picture courtesy Wulf Ingham
Autumn Colours On The Trees At Muncaster
Autumn Colours On The Trees At Muncaster Picture courtesy Wulf Ingham
Autumn Colours On The Trees At Muncaster
Autumn Colours On The Trees At Muncaster Picture courtesy Wulf Ingham
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