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Saturday 22nd November, 2014

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Wulf’s Blog

Wulf

Saturday June 26th 2010

All of a sudden, this year’s sponsored walk is a thing of the past. Only a memory, so I will be writing the report/article next week while it is still fresh in my mind. I will however include a few ‘action shots’ at the end of this blog. I have to apologize first off though because there was an error in last week’s blog, namely that it is ten years since we bred Eurasian Scops Owls and Spectacled Owls, and not ‘two’. I accidentally deleted last week’s blog just before I was supposed to E-mail it to Shaun, our web master, so I had to re-write it in a hurry. That is why I am writing this week’s blog on ‘Word’.

Anyway, this week we have a new recruit to the display team. We have that many public engagements at the moment, that we are literally having to borrow a Barn Owl to fulfil our obligations. We have therefore decided to train another Barn Owl to join the team. ‘He’ is currently, (I think it is a ‘he’), sitting in a brooder on the table opposite, watching me write the blog. He has quite small feet, which look quite fine boned. He is also seems quite placid, which is good. We think he is about three weeks old. He was hatched in the Laybourne aviary. Incidently the ex-wild Barn Owlet is doing really well, and is on schedule for release back into the wild.

While I am writing this, David has just received a phonecall that a young Kestrel is coming into the hospital. So it is all ‘go’.

The keepers have managed to use the strimmer down in the breeding ground this week, as it was starting to look like a jungle. We had to wait until this year’s owlets had grown up a bit before we started strimming, as you can imagine, this can be very noisy.

I think that this year’s breeding season is drawing to a close now. We have both pairs of White-faced Owls back on eggs, after successfully raising a first clutch, and I suspect our Ferruginous Pygmy Owls are back on eggs as well. If these birds manage to breed again, this will be a bonus.

Back to the subject of the sponsored walk, this took place on Thursday June the 24th 2010 . The route was Pillar ‘plus’, or the Mosedale Horse Shoe, ascending Pillar via the high level traverse, which was ‘interesting’. We started at 9 AM, and finished at 7.15 PM. This is the latest we have ever finished. The funds raised so far have gone towards the new computers which will be installed in the office by the middle of June. For a full report, go to the sponsored walk part of the website. Having said that, THANKYOU for your support.

Wulf
Head Keeper

This picture shows how 'precipitous' the high level traverse was
This picture shows how ‘precipitous’ the high level traverse was

The path went up the side of this!
The path went up the side of this!

Bracken admiring the view down Mosedale from 'Wind Gap'
Bracken admiring the view down Mosedale from ‘Wind Gap’

The team trudging up towards the summit of Pillar
The team trudging up towards the summit of Pillar Picture courtesy Hilary Lange

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